Apply with LinkedIn aligns stars around job networking service

Monday, July 25th, 2011 By

LinkedIn Centipede Participants in the 2010 ING Bay to Breakers. Woman visible has the LinkedIn logo tattooed to her forehead.

Apply with LinkedIn makes the online job application process easier than ever. (Photo Credit: CC BY/smi23le/Flickr)

If you thought you could make it through your career and avoid LinkedIn completely, think again. The professional networking service launched an “Apply with LinkedIn” button Monday that will change the game when it comes to online job applications. Many job recruiting aggregators and corporate sites like Netflix and Living Social are already using the new LinkedIn feature, with many more to come, according to a LinkedIn press release.

Don’t just apply now – Apply with LinkedIn

Every online job application site has the standard “Apply Now” button. However, with the adoption of the Apply with LinkedIn button, employers open up the job hunt game to a large database of qualified, tech-savvy professionals who use the LinkedIn service daily. The professional networking service is reportedly ready to use the Apply with LinkedIn feature to match up with similar efforts from online social communities like Facebook to capture a slice of the “broader Web,” writes the Associated Press.

The Apply with LinkedIn button won’t merely enable employers to interface with a stable of LinkedIn-using applicants. It will also give employers the option of customizing their LinkedIn plug-in to request up to five specific pieces of information like cover letters. LinkedIn-using applicants in turn can see at a glance whether people with their target company are in their LinkedIn network. If so, applicants can easily request referrals and letters of recommendation that are seamlessly handled by the Apply with LinkedIn system. Users can also make edits to the about-to-be-submitted LinkedIn resume on the fly.

LinkedIn’s position – today and tomorrow

According to the LinkedIn corporate blog, the Apply with LinkedIn feature will not only speed up the online job application process today – making it much easier for corporate job recruiting departments to sort through applicants – it will mean big things for employers and applicants in the future. Soon, through an under-development social graph feature, the relative value of a job applicant’s LinkedIn contacts will be easily read by employers. For applicants, Apply with LinkedIn is the first step toward a system that makes the standard job application process obsolete. From LinkedIn’s press release:

“The job application process is currently a matter of filling out data and sending it to companies and employers. What the LinkedIn apply button suggests is that job application should really be a simple statement of preference. If LinkedIn does the work for the candidate, all that is left is for the candidate to say that they want to work for a particular company. When that statement is received from the candidate, LinkedIn just transfers the profile to the company. When you think about it, there would really be no reason to even leave the LinkedIn website.”

The tech-savvy will now apply with LinkedIn

Sources

Associated Press

Gigaom

LinkedIn

Previous Article

« Brand name medications to get cheaper as patents expire

The patents for a slate of brand-name prescription medications are going to expire this year, meaning some medicines are about to become a lot cheaper. Some of the best selling medications on the market are included, so Big Pharma’s loss will be the public’s gain. Exclusivity fleeting for drug makers Copyright protections [...]
Next Article

Financial upside-down cake: China does not own America »

As Democrats and Republicans struggle to balance the federal budget and come to an agreement regarding the debt ceiling, the threat of national debt default has many perplexed. Popular opinion is “China” is the answer to “who owns America?” People also believe default will place the U.S. too far behind. [...] Photo of the U.S. national debt clock taken in November 2008.